Bibliography: Social Media (page 102 of 144)

Domine, Vanessa (2009). A Social History of Media, Technology and Schooling, Journal of Media Literacy Education. This article explores the literature in the intersecting fields of media, technology and schooling in the United States across the past two centuries. It organizes the research from a social-historical perspective through a fictionalized interview with an archetypal third-generation urban public school teacher. This topography illustrates the problems and possibilities that emerge from the chronic push for technology in schools. Of particular mention are the privileging of orality and literacy through the common school reader, the mechanization of schooling through teaching machines and television, and the transformative yet still untapped potential of computers and the internet.   [More]  Descriptors: Technology Uses in Education, Educational History, Social History, Media Literacy

Hobbs, Renee; Jaszi, Peter; Aufderheide, Patricia (2007). The Cost of Copyright Confusion for Media Literacy, Online Submission. Purpose: Media literacy educators in K-12, higher education, and after-school programs depend on the ability to make use of copyright materials (print, visual, film, video and online) in their teaching. This study investigated the knowledge, attitudes and experiences of media literacy educators regarding copyright and fair use. Methodology: Sixty-three educators from K-12, higher education, youth media, and non-profit organizations were interviewed. The interview, approximately 45 minutes or longer, usually by phone, consisted of open-ended questions organized into three broad categories: (1) how educators use copyrighted materials in the classroom or other educational setting for educational purposes; (2) how their students use copyrighted materials in their own creative work; and (3) how educators use copyrighted materials in their curriculum development, materials production, or other creative work. Results: The fundamental goals of media literacy education–to cultivate critical thinking about media and its role in culture and society and to strengthen creative communication skills–are compromised by unnecessary copyright restrictions. Among K-12 educators, youth media specialists, and college faculty, teachers face conflicting information about their rights, and their students' rights, to quote copyrighted material.  Many confront complex, restrictive institutional copyright policies in the workplace. As a result, media literacy educators use less effective teaching techniques, teach and transmit erroneous copyright information, fail to share innovative instructional approaches, and do not take advantage of new digital platforms. Conclusions: Copyright law permits a wide range of uses of copyrighted material without permission or payment. Educational exemptions sit within a far broader landscape of fair use. However, educators today have no consensus around what constitutes acceptable fair use practices. Recommendations: Media literacy educators can address this problem with the same techniques they use in their work: increasing shared knowledge. Like other creative communities, such as documentary filmmakers, media literacy educators from K-12 to university level can articulate their own shared understandings of appropriate fair use in a code of practice. This code can educate not only themselves and their colleagues, but their students and administrators. Finally, their code can guide and instruct other educators, in formal and informal settings, who use copyrighted material in their teaching for a wide range of educational purposes and goals. The following are appended: (1) Research Methodology; and (2) Interviewees. [This report was produced by the Center for Social Media, School of Communication, American University.]   [More]  Descriptors: Teacher Effectiveness, Elementary Secondary Education, Copyrights, Media Specialists

Sampson, Demetrios G., Ed.; Spector, J. Michael, Ed.; Ifenthaler, Dirk, Ed.; Isaias, Pedro, Ed. (2015). Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA) (12th, Maynooth, Greater Dublin, Ireland, October 24-26, 2015), International Association for Development of the Information Society. These proceedings contain the papers of the 12th International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA 2015), October 24-26, 2015, which has been organized by the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS), co-organized by Maynooth University, Ireland, and endorsed by the Japanese Society for Information and Systems in Education (JSISE). Full papers in these proceedings include: (1) Towards a Metadata Schema for Characterizing Lesson Plans Supported by Virtual and Remote Labs in School Science Education (Panagiotis Zervas, Eleftheria Tsourlidaki, Sofoklis Sotiriou, and Demetrios G. Sampson); (2) Divulging Personal Information within Learning Analytics Systems (Dirk Ifenthaler and Clara Schumacher); (3) Tagalong: Informal Learning from a Remote Companion with Mobile Perspective Sharing (Scott W. Greenwald, Mina Khan, Christian D. Vazquez and Pattie Maes); (4) Accounting Professor Qualification in Digital Age: A Perception Study on Brazilian Professors (Maria Ivanice Vendruscolo and Patrícia Alejandra Behar); (5) Supervisory and Digital Literacy Practices in Postgraduate Supervision: A Case Study (Sarjit Kaur, Gurnam Kaur Sidhu, Lee Lai Fong and Leele Suzana Jamian); (6) Postgraduate Students' Level of Dependence on Supervisors in Coping with Academic Matters and Using Digital Tools (Gurnam Kaur Sidhu, Sarjit Kaur, Lim Peck Choo and Chan Yuen Fook); (7) Towards Gathering Initial Requirements of Developing a Mobile Service to Support Informal Learning at Cultural Heritage Sites (Alaa Alkhafaji, Sanaz Fallahkhair and Mihaela Cocea); (8) The Development and Empowerment of Mathematical Abilities: The Impact of Pencil and Paper and Computerised Interventions for Preschool Children (Maria Lidia Mascia, Mirian Agus, Maria Chiara Fastame, Maria Pietronilla Penna, Eliana Sale and Eliano Pessa); (9) The Relationship among Self-Regulated Learning, Procrastination, and Learning Behaviors in Blended Learning Environment (Masanori Yamada, Yoshiko Goda, Takeshi Matsuda, Hiroshi Kato and Hiroyuki Miyagawa); (10) Sounds as Affective Design Feature in Multimedia Learning–Benefits and Drawbacks from a Cognitive Load Theory Prospective (Anke Königschulte); (11) The Will, Skill, Tool Model of Technology Integration: Adding Pedagogy as a New Model Construct (Gerald Knezek and Rhonda Christensen); (12) Challenges of Big Data in Educational Assessment (David C. Gibson, Mary Webb and Dirk Ifenthaler); (13) Evaluating the Interactive Learning Tool SimReal+ for Visualizing and Simulating Mathematical Concepts (Said Hadjerrouit); (14) Predicting the Risk of Attrition for Undergraduate Students with Time Based Modelling (Kevin EK Chai and David Gibson); (15) Inside the Digital Wild West: How School Leaders Both Access and Avoid Social Media (Laurie Corrigan and Lorayne Robertson) (16) More than a Broker: A Case Study of Knowledge Mobilization in a Digital Era (Lorayne Robertson); (17) How Do High School Students Prefer to Learn? (Leila A. Mills and Putthachat Angnakoon); (18) Process Models in e-Learning–Bottom-Up or Top-Down? (Sarah Sahl and Alke Martens); (19) A Model for Ubiquitous Serious Games Development Focused on Problem Based Learning (Sandro Oliveira Dorneles, Cristiano André da Costa and Sandro José Rigo) (20) Blended Interactions for Augmented Learning–An Assistive Tool for Cognitive Disability (Suman Deb, Subir Saha and Paritosh Bhattacharya); (21) Studies Relating to Computer Use of Spelling and Grammar Checkers and Educational Achievement (Odette Bourjaili Radi); (22) Design Thinking and Metacognitive Reflective Scaffolds: A Graphic Design–Industrial Design Transfer Case Study (Chien-Sing Lee and Kuok-Shoong Daniel Wong); (23) Developing a Disposition for Social Innovations: An Affective-Socio-Cognitive Co-Design Model (Chien-Sing Lee and Kuok-Shoong Daniel Wong); (24) Technology Goes Bush: Using Mobile Technologies to Support Learning in a Bush Kinder Program (Jennifer Masters and Leanne Grogan); (25) Moving in Time to a Digital Tune: A Crisis in Our Identity? (Breda Mc Taggart); (26) Examining the Effects of Field Trips on Science Identity (Leila A. Mills and William Katzman); (27) Education on the Cloud: Researching Student-Centered, Cloud-Based Learning Prospects in the Context of a European Network (Hercules Panoutsopoulos, Karl Donert, Panos Papoutsis and Ioannis Kotsanis); (28) University and Flipped Learning TIC & DIL Project: Framework and Design (Stefania Pinnelli and Andrea Fiorucci); (29) Technology-Enhanced Pedagogical Framework for Collaborative Creativity: Analyses of Students' Perception (Manoli Pifarré, Laura Martí and Andreea Cujba); (30) Collaborative Problem Solving in Share Space (Lin Lin, Leila A. Mills and Dirk Ifenthaler); and (31) A Social Networks in Education (Blanka Klimova and Petra Poulova). Short papers in these proceedings include: (1) The Work of Children: Seeking Patterns in the Design of Educational Technology (Michael Eisenberg and Zack Jacobson-Weaver); (2) Towards Supporting Communication in Relationship and Sexuality Education through a VLE (Marion McGinn and Inmaculada Arnedillo-Sánchez); (3) The Development of Computational Thinking in the Context of Science and Engineering Practices: A Self-Regulated Learning Approach (Erin E. Peters-Burton, Timothy J. Cleary and Anastasia Kitsantas); (4) A Program Complexity Metric Based on Variable Usage for Algorithmic Thinking Education of Novice Learners (Minori Fuwa, Mizue Kayama, Hisayoshi Kunimune, Masami Hashimoto and David K. Asano); (5) Apps. Accessibility and Usability by People with Visual Disabilities (Eva María Olmedo-Moreno and Adrian López-Delgado); (6) Comparing Learner Community Behavior in Multiple Presentations of a Massive Open Online Course (Silvia Elena Gallagher and Timothy Savage); (7) Developing Adolescents' Resistance to Sexual Coercion through Role-Playing Activities in a Virtual World (Marion McGinn and Inmaculada Arnedillo-Sánchez); (8) How Can One Learn Mathematical Word Problems in a Second Language? A Cognitive Load Perspective (Jase Moussa-Inaty, Mark Causapin and Timothy Groombridge); (9) Ontological Relations and the Capability Maturity Model Applied in Academia (JerÃ¥nimo Moreira de Oliveira, Laura Gómez Campoy and Lilian Vilarino); (10) Cognitive Curations of Collaborative Curricula (Amy S. Ackerman); (11) How Older Adults Use Virtual Personal Learning Networks to Support Informal, Self-Directed Lifelong Learning Goals: A Research Program Description (Dirk Morrison); (12) Significant Changes in the Environment and in Teaching Methodology of a e-Learning Discipline to Avoid Dropouts in a Course at the Federal (Gustavo Prado Oliveira, Pçivi Aarreniemi-Jokipelto and Ricardo Soares Boaventura); (13) E-Fundi as a Viable Way to Do e-Mentoring (George A. Lotter); (14) Health Care: Role of ICT in Autism (Hafiza Maimoona Shahid, Sohaib Tariq, Imran Saleem, Muhammad Adil Butt, Arslan Tariq and Iqra Tariq); (15) Investigation into Undergraduate International Students' Use of Digital Technology and Their Application in Formal and Informal Settings (Rebecca Strachan and Sanaa Aljabali); (16) E-Learning System for Learning Virtual Circuit Making with a Microcontroller and Programming to Control a Robot (Atsushi Takemura); (17) A Study on the Effects of the Rubric on Concurrent Discussion in Web-Based Environment (Jaewon Jung); (18) Brain 3M–A New Approach to Learning about the Brain, Behavior, and Cognition (Ping Li, Lauren E. Chaby, Jennifer Legault and Victoria A. Braithwaite); (19) Learner-Content-Interface as an Approach for Self-Reliant and Student-Centered Learning (Robin Nicolay, Bastian Schwennigcke, Sarah Sahl and Alke Martens); (20) Cache-Cache Comparison for Supporting Meaningful Learning (Jingyun Wang and Seiji Fujino); (21) Creating Innovative, Student-Centered Projects with App Smashing (Aimee M. Brenner and Janel S. Hauser); (22) Smart Learning: Are We Ready for It? (Petra Poulova and Blanka Klimova); (23) A Fundamental Study for Efficient Implementation of Online Collaborative Activities in Large-Scale Classes (Ryuichi Matsuba, Yusei Suzuki, Shin-Ichiro Kubota and Makoto Miyazaki); (24) Encouraging User Participation in Blended Learning: Course Reorientation (Alea M. Fairchild); (25) Assessing Problem Solving Competence through Inquiry-Based Teaching in School Science Education (Panagiotis Zervas, Sofoklis Sotiriou, Rüdiger Tiemann and Demetrios G. Sampson); (26) Music as Active Information Resource for Players in Video Games (Marian Nagorsnick and Alke Martens); (27) Making Construals as a New Digital Skill for Learning (Meurig Beynon, Russell Boyatt, Jonathan Foss, Chris Hall, Elizabeth Hudnott, Steve Russ, Erkki Sutinen, Hamish Macleod and Piet Kommers); and (28) A Semantic Basis for Meaning Construction in Constructivist Interactions (Farshad Badie). Reflection papers in these proceedings include: (1) Exploring Technology Supported Collaborative and Cooperative Group Formation Mechanisms (Mia Carapina and Ivica Boticki); (2) Developing Self-Regulated Learners through Collaborative Online Case Discussion in Educational Psychology (Patricia P. Willems and Alyssa Gonzalez-DeHass); (3) Students' Perspectives on Taking Courses Online, Blended, or a Combination (Catherine C. Schifter, Dirk Ifenthaler and Daniel White); (4) An Innovative Interdisciplinary Approach to Providing Internships for College Seniors (Kathy Fuller); (5) Fostering 21st Century Skills through Game Design and Development (Gregory P. Garvey); and (6) Development of Critical Thinking Self-Assessment System Using Wearable Device (Yasushi Gotoh). An author index is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Conferences (Gatherings), Computer Uses in Education, Learning Processes, Expertise

Feria-Galicia, Joe (2011). Mascot Politics, Public Pedagogy, and Social Movements: Alternative Media as a Context for Critical Media Literacy, Policy Futures in Education. Within the culture of central Illinois, mascot politics has been a hugely contentious issue. Since 1926, the university employed the use of the fabricated "Chief" Illiniwek to motivate and entertain fans at athletic events. Since the late 1980s, Native American students began a campaign to end this "tradition". This article examines the critical narratives of independent media producers who utilized a variety of public art forms to contest and help to finally eliminate this racist practice. Their narratives illuminate the strategic role of public pedagogy in the process of social struggle and provide an example of how the production of alternative media content can be critically appropriated in ways that help mobilize, sustain, and build collective actions for social justice.   [More]  Descriptors: Semiotics, Group Unity, Visual Aids, College Athletics

School Library Media Activities Monthly (2003). Into the Curriculum. Reading/Language Arts: Arabian Nights; Reading/Language Arts: Birds in Picture Books: Characters, Plots, and Themes; Science: Birds in Their Nests; Social Studies: Written with Quills; Social Studies: Baghdad and Iraq History. Provides five fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in reading, language arts, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, activities and procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary Education, Instructional Materials

Robinson, Alice A. (2003). Into the Curriculum. Reading/Language Arts: Fostering Cultural Understanding; Social Studies/Reading/Language Arts: American Revolution, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides two fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in reading, language arts, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, activities and procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary Education, Junior High Schools

D'Amato, Laura; Small, Esther (2003). Into the Curriculum. Art: Making Snowmen; Health: It's Flu Season!; Language Arts/Technology: Choices; Reading/Language Arts: Getting To Know Young Adult Authors; Science: It's All in the Weather; Social Studies: Middle Ages Daily Life, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides six fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with special curriculum units in art, health, language arts, technology, reading, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Art Education, Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary Education

School Library Media Activities Monthly (2003). Into the Curriculum. Dramatics/Reading/Language Arts: Jellyfish Jiggle and More; Reading/Language Arts: Birthstone Folklore; Science: Jellyfish FAQ; Science: Minerals in Caves; Social Studies: Mapping the Oceans. Provides five fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in dramatics, reading, language arts, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, activities and procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are describes for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Dramatics, Elementary Education

Goff, Brent; Patino, Vanessa; Jackson, Gary (2004). Preferred Information Sources of High School Students for Community Colleges and Universities, Community College Journal of Research and Practice. To effectively communicate with potential students, it is important to utilize their preferred information sources. Survey data were gathered from 716 high school students who planned to attend college. There were communication source differences based on race and intent to attend two-year vs. four-year institutions. Important information sources for potential community college and university students include media, social normative, and direct sources. Recruiting and marketing strategies are discussed.   [More]  Descriptors: High School Students, College Attendance, Race, Community Colleges

Goff, Brent; Patino, Vanessa; Jackson, Gary (2004). Preferred Information Sources of High School Students for Community Colleges and Universities, Community College Journal of Research and Practice. To effectively communicate with potential students, it is important to utilize their preferred information sources. Survey data were gathered from 716 high school students who planned to attend college. There were communication source differences based on race and intent to attend two-year vs. four-year institutions. Important information sources for potential community college and university students include media, social normative, and direct sources. Recruiting and marketing strategies are discussed.   [More]  Descriptors: Marketing, Information Sources, Community Colleges, High School Students

Kuehn, Kathleen M. (2011). Prosumer-Citizenship and the Local: A Critical Case Study of Consumer Reviewing on Yelp.com, ProQuest LLC. Over the past few years, content developers searching for new markets have found a potentially lucrative consumer base in local and location-based services as new media platforms have begun to "expand" their focus to hyper-local place-based communities. This shift to "local 2.0" has given birth to "local listing sites," an emerging social medium that converges the content of traditional Yellow Pages, consumer-generated content and the interactive features of social network sites. Such sites harness the productive power of "prosumers," the hybrid subjectivity of new media users who simultaneously produce and consume online content (Tapscott & Williams, 2006). These sites capitalize on the productivity of users who create discourses "through" and "about" local consumption by voluntarily rating and reviewing local businesses and services, challenging the power of institutions traditionally responsible for the production of consumer culture and reputation management (e.g., local business owners, marketers, advertisers, professional critics).   Theoretical perspectives on the power of prosumption vary across academic scholarship; on the one end of this debate are techno-utopians who believe prosumption empowers consumers whose choices have been long constrained by a top-down corporate culture and marketing industry (e.g., Bruns, 2008; Jenkins, 2007). On the other end, critical scholars position consumer-generated content as a form of free labor and thus tend to view prosumption as an inherently exploitative practice (e.g., Andrejevic, 2007; Cohen, 2008; van Dijck, 2009). Yet while the theoretical positions on prosumption are divisive, empirical research on these debates is comparatively limited–particularly as it pertains to how prosumers negotiate their role as content producers in the digital economy.   This dissertation aims to fill the lack of empirical prosumption research with an investigation of the practice of consumer-reviewing as a form of prosumption on the local listing site Yelp.com–a social networking site and local listing guide that allows consumers to rate and review local businesses and services in their community. This project aims to understand how consumers-as-media-producers experience and make sense of their productive activity through this emerging social media format, as well as the mediating role that localism plays in this process. Yelp offers up a unique opportunity to not only appropriate prosumption as a form of consumer-citizenship but to reconnect people through a local, place-based identification through social and political action. Thus, this research also explores how prosumption in the "virtual" impacts offline behaviors in the "real."  This project is a study in three parts; the first section begins with a critical discourse analysis of Yelp's promotional campaign and site architecture that investigates how the site rhetorically and structurally enables and delimits prosumer agency and power. The second section offers a textual analysis of consumer reviews in order to demonstrate how Yelp structures participation to primarily articulate prosumers as "customers" over [local] "citizens"; the third part analyzes interviews conducted with active Yelpers and argues that consumer reviewing, as a form of prosumption, is a complex and conflicting practice. While consumer reviewing is not "inherently" empowering or exploitative, its potential to serve as a form of consumer-citizenship is decidedly limited. Interviews reveal that although Yelpers negotiate and contest the discursive constraints placed on prosumption by the site's architectures of participation, these same users also "rationalize" and identify with the site's exploitative tendencies. As such, Yelp is ultimately treated as "not the place" for articulating the politics of consumption which suggest limitations in the transformative capabilities of this prosumption practice. While counter-discourses are at times employed, Yelpers ultimately work to reproduce hegemonic discourses of consumption.   [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: www.proquest.com/en-US/products/disserta…   [More]  Descriptors: Organizational Culture, Business, Discourse Analysis, Social Networks

Malott, Curry Stephenson, Ed.; Porfilio, Bradley, Ed. (2011). Critical Pedagogy in the Twenty-First Century: A New Generation of Scholars. Critical Constructions: Studies on Education and Society, IAP – Information Age Publishing, Inc.. This book simultaneously provides multiple analyses of critical pedagogy in the twenty-first century while showcasing the scholarship of this new generation of critical scholar-educators. Needless to say, the writers herein represent just a small subset of a much larger movement for critical transformation and a more humane, less Eurocentric, less paternalistic, less homophobic, less patriarchical, less exploitative, and less violent world. This volume highlights the finding that rigorous critical pedagogical approaches to education, while still marginalized in many contexts, are being used in increasingly more classrooms for the benefit of student learning, contributing, however indirectly, to the larger struggle against the barbarism of industrial, neoliberal, militarized destructiveness. The challenge for critical pedagogy in the twenty-first century, from this point of view, includes contributing to the manifestation of a truly global critical pedagogy that is epistemologically democratic and against human suffering and capitalist exploitation. These rigorous, democratic, critical standards for measuring the value of scholarship, including this volume of essays, should be the same that individuals use to critique and transform the larger society in which they live and work. This book begins with "Neoliberalism Trumping The Politics of Hope: A Critical Intervention to Challenging the Corporate Takeover of Schools and Society," a preface by Bradley Porfilio. "From Toussaint L'Ouverture to Paulo Freire: Complexity and Critical Pedagogy in the Twenty-First Century: A New Generation of Scholars," an introduction by Curry Stephenson Malott, is also included. Part I, Social Theory and Critical Pedagogy, contains: (1) When Theory Walks With Praxis: Critical Pedagogy and the Life of Transnational and Postcolonial Subjects of Color (Pierre Orelus); (2) A Placed-Based Critical Pedagogy in Turbulent Times: Restoring Hope for Alternative Futures (Martin and Kitty Te Riele); (3) Radical Hermeneutics, Adolescence, and Twenty-First Century Critical Pedagogy (Kip Kline); (4) Disrupting Heteronormativity Through Critical Pedagogy and Queer Theory (Heather Hickman); (5) Power Through Resistance: Why Critical Theory Can Prevent Educators From Going Back to the Future (Julie Gorlewski); and (6) For a Multiple-Armed Love: Ecopedagogy for a Posthuman Age (Richard Kahn). Part II, Psychology and Critical Pedagogy, contains: (7) Individual Collective Human Needs: (Re)theorizing Maslow Using Critical, Sociocultural, Feminist, and Indigenous Lenses (Tricia M. Kress, Christopher J. Aviles, Cindy Taylor, and Melissa Winchell). Part III, Educational Reform and Critical Pedagogy, contains: (8) The Magnificent Elephant That Was Promised Showed Up Lame: The 10-Year Development Plan of Basic Education and Education for All (EFA) in Burkina Faso (Touorouzou Herve Some); and (9) The Quest for a Critical Pedagogy of Democracy (Paul Carr). Part IV, Knowledge Production/Research Methodology and Critical Pedagogy, contains: (10) Developing Curricular Standpoint: "Strong Objectivity" and the Politics of School Knowledge (Wayne Au); (11) Writing We: Collaborative Text in Educational Research (Christina Ann Siry and Carolyne Ali-Khan); (12) Off-loading Self/Other/World Responsibilities: Confronting Questionable Ethics in Youth Engagement in Critical Pedagogy (Darren Lund and Jim Paul); and (13) Power Personified: Graduate Students Negotiating Hollywood Education (Catherine Lalonde). Part V, Teacher Education and Critical Pedagogy, contains: (14) Struggles to Eliminate the Tenacious Four Letter "F" Word in Education (Vivian Garcia Lopez); (15) Through the Eyes of Two Teacher Educators: Building Alternatives to the Gaze and Surveillance Mechanisms in Teacher Education (Abraham P. DeLeon and Emily Daniels); (16) Toward Mainstreaming Critical Peac Education in U.S. Teacher Education (Edward J. Brantmeier); and (17) Nice Girls Become Teachers: Experiences of Female First-Generation College Students Majoring in Elementary Education (Carrie Freie and Kirstin R. Bratt). Part VI, Classroom Teaching and Critical Pedagogy, contains: (18) Visions of Hope and Despair: Investigating the Potential of Critical Science Education (Andrew Gilbert); (19) Enacting a Transformative Education (Kurt Love); and (20) To Upend the Boat of Teacher Mediocrity: The Challenges and Possibilities of Critical Race Pedagogy in Diverse Urban Classrooms (Daniel D. Liou and Rene Gonzalez). Part VII, Technology and Critical Pedagogy, contains: (21) Scaling the Classroom Walls: Lessons Learned Outside of Schools About Social Media Activism and Education (Tricia M. Kress and Donna DeGennaro); (22) Learners and oppressed Peoples of the World, Wikify!: Wikiversity as a Global Critical Pedagogy (Juha Suoranta); and (23) Emancipatory Technologies: A Dialogue Between Hackers and Freire (Joseph Carroll-Miranda).   [More]  Descriptors: Teacher Education, Graduate Students, First Generation College Students, Critical Theory

Craig Rushing, Stephanie Nicole (2010). Use of Media Technologies by Native American Teens and Young Adults: Evaluating Their Utility for Designing Culturally-Appropriate Sexual Health Interventions Targeting Native Youth in the Pacific Northwest, ProQuest LLC. American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth are disproportionally burdened by high rates of sexually transmitted infections and teen pregnancy, heightening their need for sexual health interventions that are aligned to their unique culture and social context. Media technologies, including the Internet, cell phones, and video games, offer new avenues for reaching adolescents on a range of sensitive health topics. While several studies have informed the development of technology-based interventions targeting mainstream youth, no such data have been reported for AI/AN youth. To fill this gap, I: (a) quantified media technology use in a select group of AI/AN teens and young adults living in Pacific Northwest tribes and urban communities; (b) identified patterns in their health information-seeking and media preferences; and (c) worked with local tribes and regional partners to develop recommendations for designing culturally-appropriate technology-based interventions targeting Native adolescents.   This research included: (a) an anonymous, paper-based survey of over 400 AI/AN youths age 13-21 years; (b) a systematic review of technology-based sexual health interventions; and (c) a variety of community-based participatory research activities to analyze findings, prioritize options, and generate recommendations for designing interventions that align with the culture, needs, and organizational capacities of the tribes in the Pacific Northwest.   Technology use was exceptionally common and diverse among survey respondents, mirroring patterns reported by teens in the general population. Seventy-five percent of AI/AN youth reported using the Internet, 78% reported using cell phones, and 36% reported playing video games on a daily or weekly basis. Thirty-five percent reported that they would feel most comfortable getting sexual health information from the Internet, and 44% reported having done so in the past. Youth expressed interest in a wide array of interactive media features, and culturally-specific content that holistically encompassed their wide-ranging health interests and concerns. Tribal health educators expressed particular interest in adapting Internet-based skill-building modules and informational websites, and teens expressed interest in websites and videos. These findings are now being used by the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board to inform the development and adaptation of culturally-appropriate interventions targeting AI/AN youth in the Pacific Northwest.   [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: www.proquest.com/en-US/products/disserta…   [More]  Descriptors: Participatory Research, Video Games, American Indians, Alaska Natives

Sharples, M.; Graber, R.; Harrison, C.; Logan, K. (2009). E-Safety and Web 2.0 for Children Aged 11-16, Journal of Computer Assisted Learning. This paper reports findings from a survey and interviews with children aged 11-16 years, teachers and parents on their attitudes to e-safety in relation to social networking and media creation (Web 2.0) and their practices at school and at home. The results showed that 74% of the children surveyed have used social network (SN) sites and that a substantial minority regularly interact socially online with people they have not met face-to-face. Online interaction forms a different, although overlapping, social space to that of face-to-face friendships. Despite a desire from some teachers to explore the benefits of Web 2.0 for creative and social learning, they report being constrained by a need to show a duty of care that avoids worst-case risk to children, to restrict access to SN sites. The respondents also report more direct concerns about Internet bullying and exam cheating. We also report a Policy Delphi process with a panel of 30 people with expertise in Web 2.0 and e-safety. The panel reached a general consensus that schools should move towards allowing access to Web 2.0 sites, with children being educated in responsible and creative learning.   [More]  Descriptors: Delphi Technique, Social Networks, Children, Adolescents

Commonwealth of Learning (2008). Education for a Digital World: Advice, Guidelines, and Effective Practice from around the Globe. "Education for a Digital World" contains a collection of strategies and tools for effective online teaching, based on the principles of learning as a social process. Narrative is supplemented by real-life examples, case studies, and resources to supply comprehensive perspectives about structuring and fostering socially engaging learning in an online environment. Tips and evidence-based theory guide administrators, program and course developers, project teams, and teachers through the development of online learning opportunities. The book is designed to serve as a guide, resource, textbook and manual for policymakers and practitioners in developing and developed countries. Following Chapter Abstracts and Introduction, thirty-one chapters are divided into five sections. Part 1, The Impact of Instruction Techniques, includes: (1) Emerging Technologies in E-learning (Patricia Delich, Kevin Kelly, and Don McIntosh); (2) Virtual Design Studios: Solving Learning Problems in Developing Countries (Kris Kumar); (3) Challenges Confronted and Lessons (Un)Learned: Linking Students from the University of Ghana and Kwantlen University College (Charles Quist-Adade); (4) Addressing Diversity in Design of Online Courses (Madhumita Bhattacharya and Maggie Hartnett); (5) Mobile Learning in Developing Countries: Present Realities and Future Possibilities (Ken Banks); and (6) The Impact of Technology on Education (Mohamed Ally). Part 2, Preparing Online Courses, includes: (7) Learning Management Systems (Don McIntosh); (8) Exploring Open Source for Educators: We're Not in Kansas Anymore–Entering OS (Julia Hengstler); (9) Quality Assurance by Design (Niki Lambropoulos); (10) General Principles of Instructional Design (Peter Fenrich); (11) Accessibility and Universal Design (Natasha Boskic, Kirsten Starcher, Kevin Kelly, and Nathan Hapke); (12) Articulation and Transfer of Online Courses (Finola Finlay); (13) Planning Your Online Course (June Kaminski and Sylvia Currie); and (14) Assessment and Evaluation (Dan O'Reilly and Kevin Kelly). Part 3, Implementing Technology, includes: (15) Understanding Copyright: Knowing Your Rights and Knowing When You're Right (Dan McGuire); (16) "Open Licences" of Copyright for Authors, Educators, and Librarians (Julien Hofman and Paul West); (17) E-learning Standards (Randy LaBonte); (18) Leadership and E-learning: Change Processes for Implementing Educational Technologies (Randy LaBonte); and (19) Building Communities of Practice (Shawn Berney). Part 4, E-learning in Action, includes: (20) Instructional Strategies (Peter Fenrich); (21) Media Selection (Peter Fenrich); (22) Computer-Based Resources for Learning (Peter Fenrich); (23) Computer-Based Games for Learning (Alice Ireland and David Kaufman); and (24) Evaluating and Improving Your Online Teaching Effectiveness (Kevin Kelly). Part 5, Engagement and Communication, includes: (25) Tools for Online Engagement and Communication (Richard S. Lavin, Paul A. Beaufait, and Joseph Tomei); (26) Techno Expression (Kevin Kelly and Ruth Cox); (27) Social Media for Adult Online Learners and Educators (Moira Hunter); (28) Online Collaboration: An Overview (Paul A. Beaufait, Richard S. Lavin, and Joseph Tomei); (29) Identity in Online Education (Joseph Tomei, Paul A. Beaufait, and Richard S. Lavin); (30) Supporting E-learning through Communities of Practice (David Kaufman, Kevin Kelly, and Alice Ireland); and (31) Looking Forward: Stories of Practice (Susan Crichton and Elizabeth Childs.) The book concludes with Contributor information. Chapters are appended and referenced individually. (Contains 71 figures and 29 tables.) [This document was published jointly with BCCampus.]   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Strategies, Learning Problems, Instructional Design, Management Systems

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