Bibliography: Social Media (page 103 of 144)

Ryymin, Essi; Palonen, Tuire; Hakkarainen, Kai (2008). Networking Relations of Using ICT within a Teacher Community, Computers & Education. The purpose of the present study was to examine the network structure of a teacher community in relation to their use of information and communication technology (ICT). The participants in the study were the 33 members of the teacher community of an upper comprehensive school from a suburban area of Helsinki, Finland. The methodology of the study was social network analysis. The participants were asked to assess their networking relations according to the following five dimensions: (1) providing technical advice regarding ICT, (2) providing pedagogical advice for using ICT, (3) collaboration regarding web-based learning, (4) acquiring new knowledge or ideas of web-based learning, and (5) informal interaction between the members of the community. The results indicated that there were a few central actors in the community who dominated technical and pedagogical knowledge exchange and to whom their colleagues actively turned when seeking advice. Two of the cognitively central actors represented hybrid expertise, a characteristic of which was to merge technological and pedagogical expertise in using ICT in education. These actors also tended to have their own external networking relations that helped them keep up their high level of competence. The participants' ICT-related egocentric networks differed in size and density. There were some actors central in the network of informal interaction that were, simultaneously, peripheral in ICT-related networking activities. On the other hand, the central actors of ICT were not necessarily the socially central persons in the community. Four patterns of networking were identified in the analysis; The Counsellor offers advice actively without seeking information herself from colleagues; The Inquirer is an active seeker of ICT-related information capitalizing on her social relations; The Collaborator engages in collaborative efforts of web-based learning by using several media; and The Weakly Social prefers media rather than face-to-face contacts in his information seeking.   [More]  Descriptors: Network Analysis, Interaction, Information Seeking, Foreign Countries

Baird, Derek E.; Fisher, Mercedes (2006). Neomillennial User Experience Design Strategies: Utilizing Social Networking Media to Support "Always On" Learning Styles, Journal of Educational Technology Systems. Raised in the "always on" world of interactive media, the Internet, and digital messaging technologies, today's student has different expectations and learning styles than previous generations. This net-centric generation values their ability to use the Web to create a self-paced, customized, on-demand learning path that includes multiple forms of interactive, social, and self-publishing media tools. First, we investigate the formation of a burgeoning digital pedagogy that roots itself in current adult and social learning theories, while integrating social networking, user experience design strategies, and other emerging technologies into the curriculum to support student learning. Next, we explore how current and emerging social networking media (such as Weblogs, iPod, RSS/XML, podcasting/audioblogs, wiki, "Flickr," and other self-publishing media) can support neomillennial learning styles, facilitate the formation of learning communities, foster student engagement and reflection, and enhance the overall user experience for students in synchronous and asynchronous learning environments. The data included in this article are intended as directional means to help instructors and course designers identify social networking resources and other emerging technologies that will enhance the delivery of instruction while meeting the needs of today's neomillennial learning styles.   [More]  Descriptors: Social Networks, Cognitive Style, Online Systems, Educational Technology

Johnson, Phylis (2006). Speaking to the Heart of Oral Contextualization: The Resounding Call for Critical Discussions on Civil Participation and Disobedience, from Black Radio to the Global Classroom, Journal of Peace Education. Long overdue in the classroom is a critical examination of media coverage when seen and told through the unique vantage point of the audience and storyteller. This discussion is intended to demonstrate how to prepare students to critically examine and evaluate the social role of media within a diverse global society. The author elaborates on the case of one United States station, the historically Black-owned KJLH-FM, during and after the 1992 Los Angeles riots. The author points out how this case, as well as similar ones from other culturally specific media, might provoke unique classroom discussions on social and political issues and thus contribute toward the development of racially and ethnically relevant peace curriculum. KJLH's story is a powerful one that calls forth continued study into the rich oral history imbedded within radio as well as the significance and potential of culturally specific media in general.   [More]  Descriptors: Oral History, Mass Media Role, News Reporting, Political Issues

Zacher-Bucko, Mary Beth; Riggi, Donn; Vidor, Constance (2002). Into the Curriculum. Art/Reading/Language Arts: Children's Book Illustrator Project; Reading/Language Arts: Curious George; Social Studies: Snowplows, Trucks, and Other Vehicles that Move Snow; Social Studies: Who Lives in Afghanistan?; Social Studies: VIPs of Ancient Greece, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Presents five fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in art, reading, language arts, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional role, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are describes for each activity. Descriptors: Art Education, Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary Education

Hazergian, Carol; Marine, Cathy; Humphrey, Mary; Craig, Mary; Parker, Meredith L.; Palomaki, Julie; Willingham, Susan L. (2002). Into the Curriculum. Art: Worm Art; Reading/Language Arts: Writer's Briefcase; Reading/Language Arts: Word Play with "Kid Pix"; Science/Language Arts: Wiggle into the Library Media Center; Science: From a Seed to a Plant; Science: Seed Growth; Social Studies: Ancient Greece and Rome: Crossword Puzzle Research, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides seven fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in art, reading, language arts, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluations, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Art Education, Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary Education

Casida, Fiona; Farthing, Jennifer C.; Tasota-Miklos, Lynn (2002). Into the Curriculum. Art/Reading/Language Arts: Thumbs Up!; Health: Healthy Habits! Nutrition and You; Science: ABC Animal Newsletter; Science: What a Review!; Social Studies: Which Region?, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides five fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units is art, reading, language arts, health, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Art Education, Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary Education

Santeford, Deborah; Vidor, Constance (2002). Into the Curriculum. Art/Science: Dino Art; Mathematics: Measurement; Reading/Language Arts: Turkey Day!; Reading/Language Arts: Visual Interpretations of Poetry; Reading/Language Arts: Courage, Lyle!; Science: The Thigh Bone's Connected to…; Social Studies: Building a House; Social Studies: Who Lives in This House?, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides eight fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in art, science, mathematics, reading, language arts, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Art Education, Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary Education

Bikhazi, Cristi; Payne, Linda M.; Barwick, Martha (2002). Into the Curriculum. Reading/Language Arts: Literacy Promotion-Who Wants To Be a Millionaire?; Science: Spiders; Social Studies: American Symbols; Social Studies: Arts: Grab the Duct Tape!, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides four fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in reading, language arts, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary Education, Instructional Materials

Smith, Glenn Gordon; Ferguson, David; Caris, Mieke (2002). Teaching On-Line versus Face-to-Face, Journal of Educational Technology Systems. Investigates and describes the current instructor experience of teaching college courses over the Web versus in face-to-face formats in terms of teaching strategies, social issues, and media effects. Discusses communication styles, relationship between students and instructors, instructor workload, and discussion patterns, and proposes a model that includes isolation effects versus community effects. Descriptors: Communication (Thought Transfer), Comparative Analysis, Conventional Instruction, Discussion (Teaching Technique)

Glider, Peggy; Midyett, Stephen J.; Mills-Novoa, Beverly; Johannessen, Koreen; Collins, Carolyn (2001). Challenging the Collegiate Rite of Passage: A Campus-Wide Social Marketing Media Campaign To Reduce Binge Drinking, Journal of Drug Education. A social marketing media campaign, based on a normative social influence model and focused on normative messages regarding binge drinking, has yielded positive preliminary results of an overall 29.2 percent decrease in binge drinking rates over a three-year period. Two surveys provided information on student knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors regarding alcohol and binge drinking. (Contains 16 references and 2 tables.) Descriptors: College Environment, College Students, Drinking, Higher Education

Geiger, Michael Damon, Jr. (2012). The Effects of Participating in a Multi-Media Social Skills Intervention on the Social Functioning of Three Middle School Students with IEPs, ProQuest LLC. Students with emotional disturbance exhibit difficulty interpreting and responding appropriately to social situations occurring in the community, home, and school. Interactive multimedia instruction has advanced to the degree that it is possible to create learning environments that encourage active problem solving and knowledge construction. This paper will present the findings of the implementation of a specific software program, "Harmony Island", and its effect on the social behavior of three adolescent males with individualized education plans (IEPs) receiving special education services in a self-contained emotional disturbance (ED) supported study hall. Using a single-subject, AB, pre-post experimental design, the effect "Harmony Island" had on each participant's social behavior from the perspective of multiple data sources was evaluated over three research phases. Results of the teacher and student versions of the Social Skills Rating System, number of excused and unexcused absences, number of office discipline referrals, number of periods in alternative learning environment, number of points earned on the behavior performance sheets plus the scores of a four-item pre- and post-assessment were tabulated. Upon the completion of "Harmony Island", each participant rated the program using a 12-question post-test debriefing assessment and a three-item post-test oral assessment. The two post-assessments provided data used to evaluate how each participant rated his/her interaction with this interactive multimedia program. The results of the data evaluation were inconsistent as to the effectiveness of "Harmony Island" on the three participants' social behavior. Some data seems to indicate positive effects related to the development of appropriate social interactions and other data seems to indicate no improvement. The data sources evaluated were very dynamic and showed that "Harmony Island" may not have had any effect on the social behavior of the three participants. Future research may look to evaluate this program with a larger sample size in a more stable environment. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: www.proquest.com/en-US/products/disserta…   [More]  Descriptors: Middle School Students, Emotional Disturbances, Intervention, Computer Software

Schneider, Donald O. (1976). Instructional Media and the Social Studies, Social Education. Trends in the production of social studies instructional media are described. Descriptors: Educational Media, Educational Technology, Educational Trends, Elementary Secondary Education

Clay, Daniel; Vignoles, Vivian L.; Dittmar, Helga (2005). Body Image and Self-Esteem among Adolescent Girls: Testing the Influence of Sociocultural Factors, Journal of Research on Adolescence. In Western cultures, girls' self-esteem declines substantially during middle adolescence, with changes in body image proposed as a possible explanation. Body image develops in the context of sociocultural factors, such as unrealistic media images of female beauty. In a study of 136 U.K. girls aged 11-16, experimental exposure to either ultra-thin or average-size magazine models lowered body satisfaction and, consequently, self-esteem. Self-esteem was also lower among older than among younger girls. Structural equation modeling showed that this age trend was partially accounted for by a corresponding downward trend in body satisfaction; this, in turn, was fully accounted for by upward age trends in awareness and internalization of sociocultural attitudes toward appearance, and in social comparison with media models. Results support calls for early educational interventions to help girls to deconstruct advertising and media images.   [More]  Descriptors: Females, Body Composition, Structural Equation Models, Self Concept

Curbow, Barbara; Bowie, Janice; Binko, JoAnn; Smith, Stephanie; Dreyling, Erin; McDonnell, Karen A. (2007). Adolescent Girls' Perceptions of Smoking Risk and Protective Factors: Implications for Message Design, Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse. Using a snowball technique, in-depth interviews were conducted with 108 girls emanating from seven demographically dissimilar social networks. Girls were asked to classify 58 items as either a risk or protective factor for smoking initiation and then to assign an importance weighting to each. All items except one (worries about her weight) were clearly categorized as risk or protective; mean levels of agreement were 80.8% for perceived risk items and 92.6% for perceived protective items. Principal components analysis (PCA) of the weights given to the perceived risk items found that 28 items loaded on seven factors (social, affect, access, media, offers, family, and image) and explained 71.26% of the variance. PCA of 25 protective items revealed four factors (health, family, looks, and barriers) that explained 73.35% of the variance. Significant group differences on the importance weights were found, primarily by school (public or private), age (12-14 years or 15-16 years), having a friend who smokes (yes or no), and having tried smoking (yes or no). These group differences support the idea of having a broader array of antismoking messages for adolescent girls so that important subgroups can be targeted. Additional results support the position of developing antismoking messages with positive, affirming themes.   [More]  Descriptors: Smoking, Females, Adolescents, Factor Analysis

Halverson, Erica Rosenfeld (2010). Film as Identity Exploration: A Multimodal Analysis of Youth-Produced Films, Teachers College Record. Background/Context: Researchers have begun to document and understand the work youth do as they compose in multiple media including video games, online virtual worlds, participatory fan cultural practices, and in the digital media arts. However, we lack mechanisms for analyzing the products, especially when it comes to understanding the relationship between storytelling and identity. Objective: In this article, I bring together prior research on youth-produced media, social semiotic analysis frameworks for analyzing these products and the formal analysis of films to construct an analytic framework for understanding youth-produced films as spaces for identity construction and representation. Research design: The research reported on in this article is the design and illustration of an analytic framework for understanding how youth construct and represent their identities through the films they make. The framework design begins with Kress and van Leeuwen's (2006) work on the analysis of visual design as a set of semiotic resources for describing how we make meaning with multimodal texts. However, this work does little to depict how the specific tools of film both cinematic (e.g., editing, cinematography) and filmic (music, action) (Burn & Parker, 2003) are used to construct and communicate identities. Therefore, I turn to film theory to develop a coding scheme that can assist in the meaningful interpretation of the phases and transitions of youth-produced films. I then illustrate this framework in action by analyzing one youth-produced film, Rules of Engagement, as a multimodal product of identity. Conclusions/Recommendations: This analysis demonstrates how films like Rules of Engagement display the construction of a viable social identity primarily through the interactions among filmic elements. Specifically it is in the transition spaces between phases of the film where youth actively insert their understanding of how to represent complex portraits of how they see themselves, how others see them, and how they fit into their communities. Analyzing the products of a rich, complex literacy practice is a critical way to make sense of how youth engage with issues of identity through the media they create. This is especially important for youth who feel marginalized in mainstream institutions and do not have opportunities to explore a positive sense of self in traditional institutional contexts. Understanding how the construction of multimodal representation supports identity development processes can help us to bring these new media literacy practices to youth who are most in need of alternative mechanisms for engaging in positive identity work.   [More]  Descriptors: Films, Youth, Self Concept, Identification

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