Bibliography: Social Media (page 104 of 144)

Coverdale, Tonjia Simmone (2010). The Influence of Social Presence on e-Loyalty in Women Online Shoppers: An Application of the Social Identity Approach to Website Design, ProQuest LLC. The objective of this study is to propose and test the Social Identity Approach to Website Design research model, which extends the traditionally examined interaction between website design and e-Commerce Success by considering the role of Social Identity in the development of e-Loyalty in women online shoppers. The Social Identity Approach is a well-researched theoretical perspective in the field of social psychology that includes the Social Identity Theory (Tajfel, 1978) and the Self-Categorization Theory (Turner et al., 1987). The methodology applied an experimental, quantitative, and qualitative approach through the creation of a functioning e-Commerce boutique using theory-based website design. Using an online survey instrument comprised of existing Information Systems and Social Identity measures, data were collected from 322 women online shoppers who were members of the salient ingroup. Data analysis was conducted using Structural Equation Modeling techniques via AMOS 18.   The results of this study indicate that, in women online shoppers, the perception of social presence in an online retail store positively influences their enjoyment of the online shopping experience. The results also suggest that women online shoppers' enjoyment of an online shopping experience positively influences their intention to revisit the website or recommend the website to other online shoppers, which are e-Loyal behaviors. Although the moderating effect of Social Identity on the relationship between social presence and enjoyment was not found to be statistically significant, qualitative data analysis suggests that Social Identity is an underlying factor in the overall interaction between Social Presence, Enjoyment, and e-Loyalty, prompting the suggestion of future research to determine the specific relationship.   This multidisciplinary study contributes to literature in Information Systems, Social Psychology, Marketing, Media/Communications, Gender Studies, and Entrepreneurship. Specifically, the results support those of previous studies related to gender-based and culture-based perceptions of website quality and e-Loyalty. In addition, this study extends related studies by proposing and testing the psychographic nature of human-computer interaction as a possible catalyst for e-Commerce Success.   [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: www.proquest.com/en-US/products/disserta…   [More]  Descriptors: Females, Purchasing, Web Sites, Design

Cherry, Carolyn; Louk, Cathy; Barwick, Martha; Kidd, Gentry E. (2001). Into the Curriculum. Reading/Language Arts: Three Little Kittens and the Lost Mittens; Reading/Language Arts: A Caldecott Archaeological Dig; Science: Discovering the Periodic Table of Elements; Science: The Red-Eyed Tree Frog Jumps into Nonfiction; Social Studies: Our Nation's Beginnings-Jamestown and Plymouth Settlements, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides five fully developed school library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in reading/language arts, science, and social studies. Library media skills objectives, curriculum (subject area) objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, activity and procedures for completion, evaluation, and follow-up activities are described for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary Secondary Education, Language Arts

Mayo, Jeanne B. Pilgrim; Bautz, Kim (2001). Into the Curriculum. Guidance: Why Are You Jealous?; Reading/Language Arts: Family Storytelling-Passing On Tradition; Science/Reading/Language Arts: Middle School Wilderness Survival: An Introduction to the Big Six[TM] Research Model; Social Studies: Printing ABCs; Social Studies: Using Literature To Discuss the Revolutionary War, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides five fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in guidance, reading, language arts, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Educational Resources, Elementary Secondary Education

School Library Media Activities Monthly (2001). Into the Curriculum. Guidance: Sense of Self, Self-Esteem; Health: Clean Hands, Clean Books; Mathematics/Science: What's the Heaviest Thing in the Library Media Center?; Reading/Language Arts: Merry-Go-Round Mooo-ving Picture Show; Social Studies: I Came to School By !; Social Studies: Revolutionary War Facts. Provides six fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in guidance, health, mathematics, science, reading, language arts, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Educational Resources, Elementary Education

Lynn, Karen (2001). Into the Curriculum. Reading/Language Arts/Guidance: He's So Shy! She's So Shy!; Reading/Language Arts: What Makes It Scary?; Science: Oh, Yeah? And You're Pond Scum!; Science/Social Studies: Calendar for Water Education; Social Studies: Fall Harvest; Social Studies: Colonial Americans, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides six fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in reading, language arts, guidance, science, and social studies. Library Media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Educational Resources, Elementary Education

McGuire, Kathy; Tefft, Valerie; Stahr, Mary Ann; Vidor, Constance (2001). Into the Curriculum. Reading/Language Arts: Mmm, Mmm, Good!; Reading/Language Arts: Booktalks on Videotape; Science: How Long Does It Take To Digest Thanksgiving Dinner?; Social Studies: Inauguration Crisis; Social Studies: What Is Patriotism? How Do We Show It?; Social Studies: Bookmarks and Quizmarks: Fun with Ancient Egypt, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides six fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in reading, language arts, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Educational Resources, Elementary Education

Kremyar, Evelyn; Kudo, Constance (2001). Into the Curriculum. Science/Language Arts: Moonstruck!; Science: Insects–Friend or Foe; Social Studies: Women in History, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides three fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in science, language arts, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary Education, Elementary School Science

Bautz, Kim; Ritz-Salminen, Dianne; Stein-Grollman, Rita (2001). Into the Curriculum. Reading/Language Arts: The Mitten; Reading/Language Arts: It's a Two-Minute Mystery; Reading/Language Arts: In the Spotlight! African American Authors, Illustrators, and Poets; Reading/Language Arts: Highlighting Information – What's Important Anyway?; Science: Volcanoes; Social Studies: The Lincoln Presidency-With Whom Did He Work?, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides six fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in reading, language arts, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary Education, Junior High Schools

Franklin, Bob (2004). Education, Education and Indoctrination! Packaging Politics and the Three "Rs", Journal of Education Policy. This paper explores how recent Labour governments have tried systematically to package educational and other social policies for media presentation and public consumption. This concern has resulted in the criticism that Labour is concerned with policy presentation above content: strong on policy spin but weak on policy delivery. The first section explores Labour's attempts to set a favourable agenda in news media for its educational policies by implementing a rigorous news management strategy: the subsequent section analyses Labour's unprecedented use of advertising to promote key areas of government policy. There is a particular focus on government advertising in the run up to the 2001 general election. The paper concludes that governments' increasing reliance on advertising may cross the line which should separate the provision of public information from any attempt to persuade the public to support particular policy choices.   [More]  Descriptors: Public Policy, Advertising, News Media, Mass Media Effects

Aber, J. Lawrence; Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Ware, Angelica; Kotler, Jennifer A. (2004). Estimating the Effects of September 11th and Other Forms of Violence on the Mental Health and Social Development of New York City's Youth: A Matter of Context, Applied Developmental Science. This longitudinal study examines the effects of exposure to the terrorist attack of September 11th as well as exposure to other forms of community violence on change in the mental health and social attitudes of youths in New York City. Three quarters of the youths reported some form of direct exposure to the events of September 11th, and 80% reported a lot of exposure to at least 1 form of media coverage of September 11th; these rates were comparable with the citywide survey of public school students in New York City conducted by the New York City Department of Education. Results of a structural equation model that included controls for previous levels of mental health and social attitudes, as well as a range of demographic factors, indicated that direct exposure and family exposure to the event did not predict change in any mental health outcomes, but did predict change in levels of social mistrust; media exposure did predict posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. In contrast, victimization by other forms of violence was strongly associated with change in or current levels of all of the examined mental health symptoms, whereas witnessing other forms of violence was associated with change in or levels of 3 of 4 mental health symptoms and with increased hostile attribution bias and levels of social mistrust. Implications of the results for applied developmental and public mental health strategies in response to traumatic events are discussed.   [More]  Descriptors: Terrorism, Longitudinal Studies, Stress Variables, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

DeDeo, Carrie-Anne, Ed. (2007). The Evaluation Exchange. Volume 13, Number 1, Spring 2007, Harvard Family Research Project. This issue of "The Evaluation Exchange" describes new developments in evaluating advocacy and policy change efforts that attempt to inform or influence public policy at the local, state, or federal levels. Heather B. Weiss introduces the themes in this issue in "From the Director's Desk," examining how evaluation of advocacy differs from evaluation of other programs and services. There are eighteen articles herein: (1) "What's Different About Evaluating Advocacy and Policy Change?" (Julia Coffman) describes four ways evaluators may need to adjust their approaches when evaluating advocacy and policy change. (2) "Strategies for Assessing Policy Change Efforts: A Prospective Approach" (Justin Louie and Kendall Guthrie) outline the steps for advocacy and policy change evaluators to follow in using a prospective approach to evaluation. (3) "Evaluation Based on Theories of the Policy Process" explains how it helps to ground evaluation in theories of the policy process. (4) "Working With Logic Models to Evaluate a Policy and Advocacy Program" describes how he Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California used both macro-level and individual grantee logic models to drive the evaluation design of the Clinic Consortia Policy and Advocacy Program. (5) "Necessity Leads to Innovative Evaluation Approach and Practice" describes how the Innovation Network's methodological innovation — the intense period debrief — is used to engage advocates in evaluative inquiry shortly after a policy window or intense period of action. (6) In "Pioneers in the Field: Four Foundations on Advocacy Evaluation," representatives from four foundations discuss their expectations and approaches for assessing their advocacy and public policy grantmaking. (7) In "Evaluation and InterAction," Ken Giunta and Todd Shelton of InterAction answer HFRP's questions about their approaches and ideas on evaluating advocacy. (8) What Does Monitoring and Evaluation Look Like for Real-Life Advocates?" (Stephanie Schaefer) describes how the nonprofit Fight Crime: Invest in Kids organization uses evaluation to inform their advocacy and demonstrate their impact. (9) In "A Conversation with Kay Monaco," this former former executive director of New Mexico Voices for Children, discusses the role that evaluation plays in her organization's efforts to change public policy. (10) "Evaluating Nonprofit Advocacy Simply: An Oxymoron?" (Marcia Egbert and Susan Hoechstetter ) offers nine principles to guide advocacy evaluation, based on a recent and groundbreaking Alliance for Justice tool on this topic. (11) "Continuous Progress: Better Advocacy Through Evaluation" (Edith Asibey and David Devlin-Foltz) describes the new Continuous Progress website, which helps advocates and grantmakers collaboratively plan and evaluate advocacy efforts. (12) In "A Guide to Measuring Advocacy and Policy," Organizational Research Services identifies outcomes associated with advocacy and policy work based on its new resource, A Guide to Measuring Advocacy and Policy.  (13) "Using and Evaluating Social Media for Social Change" (Allison H. Fine) discusses her 2006 book, "Momentum: Igniting Social Change in the Connected Age," and its chapter about evaluation. (14) "The eNonprofit Benchmarks Study: Diving Into Email Metrics" (Karen Matheson) describes a recent study that helps nonprofits measure and interpret their online advocacy and fundraising success. (15) "Constituency Building and Policy Work: Three Paradigms" (Janice Hirota and Robin Jacobowitz) describes three paradigms that show how constituency building and policy change efforts can work together to achieve sustainable and systemic reform. (16) "An Emerging Framework for Assessing Nonprofit Networks" (Madeleine Taylor and Peter Pastrik) offers guidelines on how to evaluate nonprofit networks that are used to achieve social change goals. (17) "Evaluating an Issue's Position on the Policy Agenda: The Bellwether Methodology:" Policy issues need both visibility and momentum to be transformed into political action. Harvard Family Research Project's bellwether methodology helps evaluators assess if both characteristics are emerging. (18) "Evaluating Advocates' Spheres of Influence With Domain Leaders:" The evaluation of the Center for Tobacco-Free Kids gathered data from a wide range of audiences that the advocacy organization targets in order to influence public policy. This issue closes with "New & Noteworthy," a section featuring an annotated list of papers, organizations, initiatives, and other resources related to this issue's theme. It also contains "End Notes" in which key observations raised in this issue are summarized. [Additional funding for this issue was provided by the Marguerite Casey Foundation.]   [More]  Descriptors: Social Change, Public Policy, Logical Thinking, Interaction

Levi, Titus (2002). Mission-Driven Media: Not Just Survival, but Success. A Report of the Aspen Institute Forum on Diversity and the Media (Aspen, Colorado, July 11-14, 2001). This report of the Aspen Institute Forum on Diversity and the Media, supported and funded by the Ford Foundation, is not a typical Aspen Institute forum report. It explores an issue–the sustainability of mission-driven media–and through this discussion becomes a kind of resource guide for managers and others who desire to preserve and promote ethnic and social justice media. This is a report of a Forum convened in Aspen, Colorado, by the Aspen Institute Communications and Society Program (July 11-14, 2001), but it offers more than a summary of the discussion. It offers advice to the media manager, the foundation executive, the investment officer, the advertiser, the aspiring entrepreneur, and others on how each can help sustain these media now and into the future. The report begins with an attempt to define "mission-driven media"–a term coined by the Ford Foundation for the group of ethnic, cultural, community, and social justice media that have a specific purpose that drives them beyond the profit motive or general news source for a heterogeneous community. Although there are many barriers and obstacles to sustainability, three overriding issues emerged at the Forum sessions. The first is the problem of access to capital. A second focus of the conference is the need for research on the emerging diverse populations and markets that mission-driven media seek to serve. Their third area of discussion and recommendation is that of binding together for greater results, whether that means better social networking or an association of associations. The report ends with a list of items that participants at the Forum thought were necessary for their suggestions and advice to move forward. An appendix includes a list of conference participants; author biography; brief description of the Aspen Institute Communications and Society Program; and previous publications from the Aspen Institute Forum on Diversity and the Media.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Information, Cultural Pluralism, Ethnic Groups, Futures (of Society)

Dumas, Nathaniel William (2010). Morphophonological Practice: An Ethnographic Study of Grammar and Discourse in Four American English Stuttering Speech Communities, ProQuest LLC. Using the Practice Theory Approach to Language, this dissertation examines how social actors use communicative practices within activities to constitute a communicative context that I call the American English Stuttering Speech Community (AESSC). Building on previous linguistic research on stuttering and sociological research on collectives of persons-who-stutter, I expand upon and diverge from many of the available analytical models and conceptual frameworks. Contrary to previous work in linguistics and speech pathology that locates stuttering as a disability, I argue for conceptualizing stuttering as sociolinguistic variation (i.e., linguistic behavior partly driven by social context). Moreover, I extend previous ethnographic research in sociology that positions collectives of persons-who-stutter (PWS) as "self-help groups." I reposition these collectives as part of a broader "speech community," which entails participation in particular discursive activities in addition to sharing linguistic form. The dissertation, thus, analyzes the AESSC as a communicative context established by numerous groups over time that (1) organize around stuttering as a kind of linguistic variation and (2) develop speech genres and activities that reconfigure the interactional identities of "speaker" and "hearer," and other facets of social organization. To develop this argument, I analyze data from audio-visual recordings and transcripts of face-to-face, naturally-occurring interactions of meetings from three California chapters in the "Stuttering Organization of America" (SOA, pseudonym). My dissertation is structured in the following manner. Chapter One introduces the research question, analytical framework, and relevant background literature used in the study. Building off a previously unexplored hypothesis by Landar (1961), Chapter Two argues for a linguistic analysis of stuttering forms as variational duplication and uses field recordings of naturally-occurring interaction. This chapter also presents a formal definition of stuttering as variation, with a specific focus on American Stuttering English (ASE). Chapters Three and Four analyze two routine genres in SOA as socioculturally-situated activities that are interdiscursive with and provide new perspectives on prior types of speech events. "Introductions" (Chapter Three) allow ASE speakers to re-negotiate the act of saying one's name, construct a self within interaction that signals the stance "I am more than my speech," or complex personhood, and constitute interactants as members of the community. The "talking circle" (Chapter Four) analysis demonstrates how interactants use verbal art (e.g., narrative) as performance to implicitly recreate aesthetics of good/bad speech, jointly negotiate evaluations of one's linguistic style, and, indirectly, produce an alternative linguistic market that recognizes ASE speakers as effective public speakers. Finally, I analyze how social actors, through media literacy practices within face-to-face and computer-mediated discourse practices, negotiate different alignments towards each other, their speech, and representations of their speech through mainstream media genres (e.g., jokes and human-interest stories featured in films and electronic media). Chapter Six summarizes the findings and suggests the theoretical, conceptual and methodological implications of the work. In sum, using the AESSC as a case study, the dissertation contributes insights to linguistic anthropology. This study analyzes how persons, in a particular sociohistorical context, jointly accomplish (a) the construction of linguistic forms and their multiple meanings; (b) the discursive activities of which these forms are a part of; and (c) the identities and collectives that these activities constitute. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: www.proquest.com/en-US/products/disserta…   [More]  Descriptors: Grammar, Discourse Analysis, Stuttering, Linguistic Theory

Baum, Elizabeth T.; Kraft, Kellee; Kebetz, Lori L.; DiPasquale, Renee H.; Fleischer, Barbara (2000). Into the Curriculum. Science: Thematic Science Fairs with an Integrated Flair [and] Science/Language Arts: Bugs, Bugs, Bugs [and] Science/Language Arts: Extra, Extra! Write All about It! [and] Social Studies: Voyages Around the World: Women Pioneers [and] Social Studies: Women's History Month, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides five fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in science, language arts, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Class Activities, Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Educational Resources

Darden, Betty Lynn; McGuire, Kathy; Andrews, Corrine C. (2000). Into the Curriculum. Science: Eric Carle: "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" [and] Science: Icky Invertebrates [and] Social Studies: "Many Color Fact Feather"-Native American Tribes [and] Social Studies: Refugees and Loss of Homeland, School Library Media Activities Monthly. Provides four fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in science and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Descriptors: Course Integrated Library Instruction, Curriculum Development, Elementary School Science, Elementary Secondary Education

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