Bibliography: Social Media (page 110 of 144)

International Inst. of Communications, London (England). (1977). Issues in Communication. Number 1. Based on the papers and discussions of the 1977 Annual Conference of the International Institute of Communications, this publication provides a survey of major issues in communication. It deals with a variety of topics, including issues facing the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference; news values and social priorities; the media in developing countries; international broadcasting; communications policies and structures in various countries; broadcasting systems in Britain, the Arab states, and Sweden; information services and telecommunications; and new communication services–such as citizens-band radio–that promise wider individual access to media. Descriptors: Broadcast Industry, Communications, Conferences, Developing Nations

Gorney, Roderic; Steele, Gary (1976). The Mass Media of Entertainment and Human Survival. Urgently needed for human survival is a means of influencing large numbers of people to put into rapid action measures which could neutralize such menances as pollution, overpopulation, and violence. Though the cumulative effect of the mass media is not fully established, media entertainment may be the most influential institution in our society. To avoid the spector of censorship, the media would be best controlled through a systematic and open discussion of the social impact of media presentations conducted by media experts and by interested citizens. This action would result in full, advance disclosure of assumptions, attitudes, and values built into mass entertainment. Descriptors: Attitude Change, Behavior Change, Behavior Development, Broadcast Industry

Welch, Alicia J. (1995). The Role of Books, Television, Computers and Video Games in Children's Day to Day Lives. A study assessed the role of various mass media in the day-to-day lives of school-aged children. Research questions dealt with the nature of children's media experiences at home, how use of media impacts school activities, the social context of media use, interior responses to different media, and whether gender or socioeconomic differences among children figure in media use. Children (all in grades 3 and 4) from opposite ends of Connecticut participated in the study. Respondents were approached through letters sent home–in the first community, children were interviewed at home, in the second community, they were interviewed at school. Children were evenly divided by sex; almost all were white. A broad array of questions was posed. Results showed that children had extensive access to media, including VCRs, cable television, and personal computers. A large number live in media-rich environments. As for media use–books are a nighttime activity, computers are used any time, and entertainment media seems to be an after-school relaxer. How media use impacts school activities is not clear, but the differences in media use among higher and lower achieving children needs to be explored in greater depth. Findings also suggest that the social contexts of media use are many and varied. (Contains 4 tables of data and 20 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Childhood Attitudes, Childhood Interests, Computers, Elementary Education

Hobbs, Renee (1999). The Seven Great Debates in the Media Literacy Movement. As the media literacy movement gains momentum in the United States, the increasingly diverse community of educators, community organizers and activists, scholars, social service and media professionals have a lot of issues to debate because media literacy can take many different forms. Moreover, the techniques of media analysis can be relevant to almost every major policy issue–both domestic and international–and media production makes it possible for people to contribute their voices to the complex, deep, and important issues for the 21st century. "Yes" or "No" responses to the following seven great debates will serve to build the basic principles of what media literacy will become over the next few years: (1) Does media literacy protect kids? (2) Does media literacy require student media production activities? (3) Should media literacy have a popular culture bias? (4) Should media literacy have a stronger ideological agenda? (5) Can media literacy ever reach large numbers of students in K-12 American schools? (6) Should media literacy initiatives be supported financially by media organizations? and (7) Is media literacy best understood as simply a means to an end?   [More]  Descriptors: Cultural Context, Elementary Secondary Education, Higher Education, Mass Media Role

Braun, Joseph A., III, Ed. (1994). Social Justice and Media. Media Corner, Social Studies and the Young Learner. Contends that the end of slavery, women's suffrage, and the civil rights movement were watershed events of social justice in U.S. history. Provides reviews of two media-based sets of instructional materials that can help students understand the struggle by disenfranchised groups to become full participants in society. Descriptors: Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, Computer Uses in Education, Curriculum Design

BROWN, ROBERT M.; AND OTHERS (1965). CUE, SOCIAL STUDIES HUMANITIES MEDIA GUIDE. THIS DOCUMENT IS ONE OF A SERIES OF MEDIA GUIDES SPONSORED BY THE NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT UNDER THE CUE SYSTEM. THE HUMANITIES AREAS ARE DIVIDED INTO 11 DIFFERENT TOPICS. WITHIN EACH TOPIC IS A SERIES OF SUGGESTED FILM AND TELEVISION SUBJECTS. A DISCUSSION IS GIVEN ON EACH OF THE SUBJECTS INCLUDING A SYNOPSIS, A STATEMENT OF PURPOSE, SUGGESTED PREPARATION OF THE CLASS, THINGS PUPILS SHOULD LOOK AND LISTEN FOR, AND SUGGESTIONS FOR FOLLOWUP ACTIVITIES AND RELATED ACTIVITIES. A LIST OF PRODUCERS AND THEIR ADDRESSES IS INCLUDED. THIS DOCUMENT IS A LATER VERSION OF ED 003 786.   [More]  Descriptors: Cultural Activities, Curriculum Enrichment, Curriculum Guides, Enrichment Activities

ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL. (1978). Journalism and Journalism Education: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1978 (Vol. 39 Nos. 1 through 6). This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 13 titles deal with the following topics: publisher and journalist attitudes toward collective bargaining; editorial support for freedom of speech and press; the need for a scholarly index to collections of black newspapers published from 1880 to 1915; the daily newspaper industry in the United States; the social organization of media news production; innovations in newspaper technology; magazine journalism education in Britain, Canada, and the United States; a comparative analysis of newspaper and television coverage of the 1976 Democratic National Convention; a Q-study of the value structures and professionalism of reporters, editors, and photographers; the new printing technology and journalism education; how advanced reporting courses are taught and what they contain; gag orders and the First Amendment; and the influence of network television news on public opinion. Descriptors: Annotated Bibliographies, Blacks, Collective Bargaining, Communications

Wilhelmsen, Frederick D.; Bret, Jane (1970). The War in Man; Media and Machines. The authors present a picture of contemporary man torn by conflicting forces, caught in a psychic house divided against itself, a victim of war between media and machines. Machines, they state, represent the rationalistic tradition which has brought man to the brink of psychic and social disaster. The media they see as offering hope–true individuality, significant community, and actual leisure. Borrowing from psychology, philosophy, sociology, and history, the authors project a synthetic view of man for the 1970s. They predict a revolution in our concepts of education, knowledge, time, work, and politics brought about by the electronic media. Drawing on thinkers as diverse as McLuhan, Marcuse, Freud, and Marcel, they conclude that western man is moving into an age in which the philosophy of culture is essential. Descriptors: Education, Mass Media, Politics, Social Change

Clark, Richard C., Ed. (1981). A Portfolio of Energy Ideas: Social Studies. Presented are 12 social studies units which examine current energy issues and present energy dilemmas for careful study and reflection. The activities emphasize: (1) a range of teaching strategies; (2) problem identification, problem solving, and problem analysis; (3) futures education; (4) students as active learners; and (5) consideration of the thoughts, feelings, and attitudes which the energy situation evokes. These teacher-oriented materials include an overview of each unit, background information, teaching strategies, follow-up activities, evaluation questions, resource materials, and other useful information. Students use brainstorming, large and small group discussion, questionnaires, values clarification techniques, and other similar strategies to examine different energy-related issues. Some of these include lifestyles, social obstacles, laws, media, conservation, energy dependency, alternative energy sources, and regulations. Descriptors: Activity Units, Conservation Education, Elementary Secondary Education, Energy

National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education, Berkeley, CA. (1980). Selected Bibliography on Asian and Pacific American Children and Families. Asian Pacific American Education Occasional Papers. This is an annotated bibliography of recent articles, books, and scholarly papers on Asian and Pacific American children and families. Works are divided by topical area, with a primary focus on literature related to the education of Asian/Pacific American children. There are four main topical divisions: (1) education; (2) family; (3) mental health; and (4) social issues. Under the category of education, subtopics include achievement, bilingual education and English as a second language, the classroom, materials, research, and school programs. Topics listed under family include the elderly, parent-child interactions, and socialization and acculturation. The section on mental health lists works on attitudes, cognitive development, communication, mental health issues, and personality. The final section on social issues is divided into works on communities, demography, the media, social economic studies, Vietnamese refugees, women, and youth.   [More]  Descriptors: Annotated Bibliographies, Asian Americans, Children, Educational Experience

White House Conference on Families, Washington, DC. (1980). White House Conference on Families: Summary of State Reports. Volume One. This compilation contains the verbatim texts of recommendations made by states' delegates from 16 northeastern states participating in the Baltimore regional conference of the White House Conference on Families. The recommendations are organized by topic for each of the individual states. Topics include the following as related to the family: work policies; income supports; housing; the legal system; health and social services; the media; education; transportation; world problems; federal policy; the elderly; religion; child care; abortion; ethnic and cultural diversity; alcoholism; drug abuse; food and clothing costs; tax reform; and teenage pregnancy. States and territories participating in the Baltimore conferences were Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania.   [More]  Descriptors: Conferences, Day Care, Economic Status, Education

Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France). (1978). An Original Experiment: "La Radio Television Educative Romande". The Council for Cultural Co-operation's symposium of December 1977 met in Lausanne, Switzerland, for the purpose of critiquing two experimental educational television series designed to contribute to understanding of current affairs and the way in which the media present them, and to knowledge of television as a medium. These in-class programs for children and adolescents are designed to develop critical viewers from this audience by suggesting themes for thought that focus on the value of the messages transmitted. Discussions of the experiments, the teaching of television language, and the ethical implications of introducing current affairs broadcasts into the classroom are presented. Appendix A briefly explores the concept of creativity in the context of social values, the media, and education. Descriptors: Creativity, Critical Thinking, Current Events, Educational Television

Hicks, Leo B. (1967). An Experiment in School – Community Relations. Family community aides were used in disadvantaged East Saint Louis, Illinois, schools in an effort to bridge the communication gap between the school and the home. The indigenous nonprofessional aides received 16 weeks of training to perform auxiliary noninstructional service and to act as liaison personnel between school and community. These aides also made home visits, conducted surveys, and provided the parents with information about school programs and personnel, and services available from social agencies. Mass media also informed the parents about what the schools were doing for disadvantaged students and their families. An evaluation of this project showed that the aides established good rapport with teachers and the community but were not successful in changing the negative parent attitudes about student-teacher relations and the educational quality of the schools. The aides themselves showed no positive changes in attitudes about student-teacher relations or educational quality of the schools.   [More]  Descriptors: Ancillary Services, Attitude Change, Community Attitudes, Disadvantaged

Busby, Linda J. (1975). The Uses of Media Theory in a Broadcast Curriculum. There has been an increasing emphasis on the social responsibility of media within the past 25 years. Social responsibility began with the Fairness Doctrine, the Equal Time Rule, and other Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regulations, but was expanded further when cigarette commercials were banned in 1971. Freedom of speech in programing must be retained and the truth encouraged in advertising. Legal challenges involving the social responsibility of television stations are centered around three main issues: (1) station awareness of the needs and interests of the local community, (2) station discrimination in employment, and (3) the need for more programing of a particular type. These issues will be an important point for media students to study in the future, and a strong background in media theory will be needed to cope with these problems. Social responsibility can either initiate an era of examination and development for the good of society or it can clog the courts with petty complaints.   [More]  Descriptors: Broadcast Industry, Broadcast Television, Communications, Futures (of Society)

Bethlehem Area School District, PA. (1973). Urban Studies: Strategies for Teaching. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Language Arts and Social Studies. The guide outlines an interdisciplinary seventh grade course on urban studies focusing on the city of Bethlehem and the Lehigh Valley in Pennsylvania. By comparing the city of Bethlehem with other urban centers in the nation the student gains an understanding of the following: 1) the development of urban centers; 2) the increasing role played by cities in national life; 3) problems faced in urban areas and how they might be solved; 4) the life of the people who reside in cities; 5) the rights and values of others. Suggested teaching strategies include questioning techniques, classroom discussion, surveys, research, field trips, role playing, games and creative writing. Language arts teachers work closely with social studies teachers in a team teaching effort: oral and written communication skills are taught within the context of realistic situations provided by the social studies. The guide consists of the following five units: 1) Social/Mass Media; 2) Economic/Short Story and Novel; 3) Government/Drama; 4) Physical Structures/Poetry; and 5) A Vision of the Future. An overview, concepts to be taught, objectives, social studies and language arts resource materials, names of local resource people, teaching strategies, and individual and small group activities are provided for each unit.   [More]  Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, Course Descriptions, Course Objectives, Cultural Awareness

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